The exact temperatures a printed part can withstand will depend on the specific polymer blend (which varies by manufacturer), the time scale of the load applied, as well as, shockingly, the

Unfortunately, most materials data youll find doesnt take into account slow-acting effects like creep, or crystallization effects that can be changed by printing conditions or annealing/tempering heat cycles. For example, the basic Vicat or HDT tests raise the temperature too fast to reveal how unreliable PLA is for long-term load-bearing parts. PLA can withstand high short-term stresses but can fail under relatively low stress in a matter of weeks or months. On the other hand, PLA has very complex crystalline phase behavior, and can transition between more or less stable configurations depending on its thermal history. People are just now starting to really experiment with annealing to deliberately modify these material properties. There isnt much public data out there yet.

Heres the basic data, with the caveat that blends vary and you need to perform proper lab testing before doing any real engineering.

ABS: fully load-bearing up to about 60C, creeps over about 80C, rapidly deforms over 105C

PLA (non-annealing blends): only suitable for low stress loads or short-duration loads at any temperature, creeps to brittle rupture (!!) when highly stressed at room temperature, deforms rapidly over 55C

PLA (annealed): may be capable of load-bearing up to 80C, but there isnt enough rigorous test data out there to conclude much with certainty. Some dimensional deformation may occur during annealing.

Nylon: Fully load-bearing to about 40C, creep is unlikely under low stresses (but may or may not occur with high stresses) depending on blend and print settings due to crystallinity, deforms rapidly over about 140C [note: there are a lot of different types of nylon for 3d printing now, YMMV]

PETG and closely-related copolyesters: fully load-bearing to about 50C, creep around 60C, deforms rapidly over about 75C

PC (virgin): fully load-bearing to about 100C, creeps around 120C, deforms rapidly around 150C

PC (easy-printing blends): fully load-bearing to about 75C, creeps around 100C, deforms rapidly around 120C

You can take any of these and add a composite material (like carbon fiber) and significantly raise the acceptable service temperature range. Embedded fibers reduce creep and may (depending on resin/fiber adhesion) strengthen the material in general.

For really high temp service, Stratasys can print Ultem, or you can switch to a different technology such as metal printing.

Related QuestionsMore Answers Below

Can a trimmer wire be used as a 3D printer filament?

Do 3d printer filaments have a shelf life?

Do 3D printers also help us with 3D designs?

What is a good cheap ABS filament for my 3D printer?

The heat tolerances for 3D printer filaments is 0.05mm. You should buyPET filament printingto get great 3D printing results. This is the highest quality filament for FDM 3D printing on the market today. The results of this filament is just incredible. You can print with confidence that this filament wont jam or clog your extruder. Order your printing filament today!

ColorFabb_HT is a departure from traditional ABS and PLA filaments, in that it is made from a completely new material designed specifically for 3D Printing. In this case, the filament is comprised primarily of Eastman Amphora copolyester to make a filament with odor-neutral processing, higher heat tolerance, and overall higher strength.

In general these filaments do not crack because of heat. They are thermoplastic so the one major thing that all of these filaments have is something of a glass transition phase. This possibly instead of a single melting. For instance, ABS has a glass transition point of 105c. It loses viscosity until increasing as the temperature increases. It does not have to do this linearly or in a regular way. In part because ABS is made up of the separate three other molecule; polybutadiene with styrene and acrylonitrile. The glass transition tells us that the molecule is amorphout or at least semi amorphous. That said if you get ABS to cold it will lose its impact strengt. As it heats to the Glass transition point it softens. This gives it a working temperature range from -20 to 80C. Also crossing over the glass transition point while cooling can see an 8% shrinkage in size. Most of this is onThermoplastic – Wikipediaor rather this is a hub to all most all the plastic you are interested in. More importantly sources have links to MSDS.

There are other groups that are much more likely to break down like you are talking about. They are called thermosetting plastics.

Richrap was the first I know of to print with polycarbonate this is his blog entry from 2011Indestructamendel – Polycarbonate 3D Printing with Prusa Mendel

Biodegradable Polyesters- your more on the organic chemistry or play hard reseach this site is about polymers.

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Still have a question? Ask your own!

Can a trimmer wire be used as a 3D printer filament?

Do 3d printer filaments have a shelf life?

Do 3D printers also help us with 3D designs?

What is a good cheap ABS filament for my 3D printer?

How does a 3D printer work? Are there ones that are even able to print food?

Are 3D scanners as disruptive as 3D printers?