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Understand the Different Types of 3D Printing and How They Apply to Your Design

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Understand the Different Types of 3D Printing, and How They Apply to Your Design

Now that you know the basics of 3D printing (covered in the Day 1 class), we can dive deeper into the various types of 3D printing technologies, as there are many, and the number continues to grow as the technology continues to evolve. There are different types of printers and there are different types of materials. And there are lots of different software packages available to create and print your design. Matching the right printer to the right material to the right software is easy, once you understand the principles. And thats exactly what well cover in Day two of this class.

Alex Hussain, Co-Founder & VP of Engineering & Design, 3DChimera

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Keeping Your IoT Devices Secure From Design to Decommissioning

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

In our first two classes, we have looked at the needs of a cloud-based IoT solution and how to design and build it. In this final class our expert instructor will cover the critical aspects of how to test and deploy our IoT solution, and more importantly, how to keep it secure and operational through ongoing monitoring and maintenance. We will look at how Device Cloud enables ongoing monitoring and maintenance for the devices through the entire life cycle of the IoT solution from design through end-of life. Particular elements to be covered will include Device Cloud functionality such as edge management and data management. Still in its relative infancy, the IoT is already being hacked at an alarming rate. We need to include the tools and the platform to stay one step ahead, keep our devices secure and up-to-date, and maintain a vigilant eye on the system throughout its life. Sponsored by Wind River.

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

As we learned in our first class, we need a cohesive platform of tools and various building blocks to build a robust cloud-based IoT solution to meet the needs of even high-reliability IIoT applications. In this second class on cloud-based design for the IoT, our expert instructor will discuss how a combination of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) technologies and software-defined architecture (SDA) from Wind River® is ushering in a new era of IoT innovation. Some of the topics to be covered include development tools and example pre-build platforms for many popular targets, connectivity and control APIs, and network and infrastructure platforms and services. Our instructor will also cover the topics of how to assure our communications and data are secure and properly communicated, filtered, collected, and safely stored. Current industry estimates are that only 10-25% of data is actually collected and stored when this data increases by perhaps two orders of magnitude in the next five years, how can we assure that we can indeed collecting, communicating, using, and saving the data we need? We will look at some of the answers to that question in this class. Sponsored by Wind River.

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Before we begin our IoT system solution, we need to fully understand the overall structure and key elements of a robust and secure cloud-based system. In this leadoff class, our expert instructor will review these needs as well as the possible challenges that we face and will continue to face in our IoT system throughout its life cycle. We will review the basics of designing for the IoT as well as the primary elements that are needed in its design. Issues to be covered include safety, security, device management, data management, network communications and infrastructure, and maintenance. We will look at Wind River Helix Device Cloud, a SaaS IoT device management platform, and how its ready-built elements can be integrated into our IoT design. Sponsored by Wind River.

Virtualization Increases Your IoT Critical Infrastructure Systems Cybersecurity

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

With the connection to the Internet and the connectivity to a plethora of devices, cybersecurity is a big issue. This dovetails with the need for multiple levels of safety that were discussed in Day 2, as it pertains to the cost of certification in critical infrastructure IoT. While this may sound like a complex endeavor, it doesnt have to be. Attend Day 3 of this three-day course, and well make sure that youre headed in the right direction. We will show you how your IoT applications can be made secure and updated with critical cybersecurity patches while at the same time your safe and certified critical infrastructure applications remain untouched. In addition, well provide a wrap-up of the three days and be sure to answer any outstanding questions. Sponsored by Wind River.

Use Virtualization To Enable Safety-Certified IoT Critical Infrastructure System

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Companies are updating their critical infrastructure, and safety has become a key issue, with increased regulation and risk of litigation driving the need for safety certification in industries such as aerospace, energy, industrial automation, medical, and robotics. One area of concern is partitioning safety certified and non-safe code and thats what well cover in Day 2 of this three-day course. Well look at how using virtualization, Java, analytics and various types of partitioning in your IoT design can maximize safety and reduce your overall design cost and risk. Sponsored by Wind River.

How to Design Safe, Secure, and Reliable IoT Critical Infrastructure Systems

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Theres no way around it; as a software developer, system engineer, or system architect, youre going to encounter design complexity when developing safe, secure and reliable IoT systems for todays critical infrastructure. But in this new software-defined world and with the IoT exploding around us, companies like yours must adapt to stay relevant. While legacy critical infrastructure is too expensive to just replace completely, there are ways to implement new features that will define premium products for your market and meet the safety and security requirements necessary for connecting to the IoT. In Day 1 of this three-day class, well look at how you can transform digitally and ensure that your applications remain safe and secure. Sponsored by Wind River.

Powering the Industrial Internet of Things

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Dont confuse the Internet of Things (IoT) with the Industrial IoT (IIoT), which typically has much more stringent characteristics. Thats because the IIoT usually involves some sort of manufacturing, robotics, or other mission-critical application, where down-time can be measured in dollars, often lots of them. In Day 3 of this three-day class, well look at how to best power your IIoT application, which could include FPGA power and design considerations for high-speed RS-485 data links. The class will use the Intersil PowerCompass tool to help simplify the design. Day 3 sponsored by Intersil

Designing for Safety in Non-Mobile Applications

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Ensuring that currents dont exceed safe levels is just one area that will be explored in Day 2 of this three-day class. Using specific product examples to remove the guesswork, o
ur expert instructor will explain how to protect against overcurrent damage using a 12-V buck regulator family as the design example. Youll also get an understanding of how linear and low drop-out (LDO) regulators operate, including their key performance parameters. Day 2 sponsored by Intersil

Designing for Safety in Battery-Powered Applications

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Recent events have proven that you can never be too careful when youre designing batteries into your systems, and that covers everything from wearables to hybrid/EV battery packs. In Day 1 of this three-day class, well look at how to make your battery packs safer; how to build a USB-to-controller interface that talks to a power device; and how to extend battery life in wearable devices. The class concludes with a question and answer period between the attendees and the expert instructor. Day 1 sponsored by Intersil.

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

In our final class, we will look at the Things of the IoT our nodes and devices and how we can effectively commission, monitor, and detect problems in them throughout their lifecycle. We will look at methods for adding device management capabilities in our devices from the design stage as well as ways to add these capabilities in the legacy devices we looked at in the previous class. One topic we will look at is effective commissioning and decommissioning of devices in the network how can we add or remove a node from the network without adversely impacting the rest of the network? Another area we will look at is security assurance and testing: how can we be sure of the device security and how can we test it? And lastly we will look at maintenance. What methods can we use for testing devices or paths within the network and how can we effectively and safely perform system updates? To conclude our class, we will review our checklist and see what other issues we may need to be aware of in our IoT design. Day 3 sponsored by Wind River

Monitoring and Securing IoT Data and Communications

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

In our second class, we will begin at the heart of the Internet of Things the sending and receiving of data to our things. Whether its collecting a simple room temperature reading or capturing a video frame for analysis, the IoT enables us to collect huge amounts of data for analysis then send out data in the form of commands or as human-readable data. The diversity of end devices makes this task difficult at best, as it involves myriad data types and protocols. This is key as we want to ensure the safety, security, and integrity of that data from its source to its intended destination. We will look at various methods we can use in our device design to effectively monitor and secure our data flow throughout the entire IoT network. Also, we will look at ways that we can approach communications issues with different protocols and physical layers in our network, which often consist of legacy devices that were not originally designed for the robustness required in the IoT. Day 2 sponsored by Wind River

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

In this lead-off class, we will briefly review the principles of the IoT and some of the basic configurations that we may encounter (star with gateway, tree, and mesh) and how the devices are best connected to maximize efficiency. We will look at the major issues we face as these networks and associated things become more complex, including data issues, communication issues, device monitoring and troubleshooting, and system security. We will identify potential weaknesses in each of these areas and compile a checklist of features that we need in a management system that will carry out these needs. We will also look at ways to prioritize the criticality of the devices and/or their data to help us in assigning levels of security and monitoring capabilities (for example, a temperature sensor used to sense a fire versus a temperature sensor for outside ambient temperature). Day 1 sponsored by Wind River

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Putting together the various pieces of an IoT system is like assembling a jigsaw puzzle. But its a finite task that most engineers can get through. When it comes to the operating system, other runtime software and the development tools available, here are seemingly endless possibilities. Hence, on Day 3 of this three-day class, well help you figure out what software is needed for your system, where you can find that software, how you can evaluate the software, what tools are available to help assemble the pieces and build your applications, and how to test it after its been deployed. Day 3 sponsored by Intel.

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

While we cant build your complete system, we can take you through some of the key stages thatll put you well on the way toward finishing your design. In Day 2 of this three-day class, well look at the common subsystems with an IoT edge device and what you need to know to connect to the Fog and the Cloud. Well also show you what some of the typical hurdles/stumbling blocks are, and most importantly, well show you how to navigate that slippery slope using an Intel Atom processor as our design example. Day 2 sponsored by Intel.

Determine Which Processor is Right for your IoT Application

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

All processors are the same, right? Well, not exactly. In fact, they vary greatly in terms of price, performance, power consumption, and a host of other features that can make or break your design. In Day 1 of this three-part class, we will go over different design requirements and where the Intel Atom processor fits. Then well get into the feature set thats best for your specific IoT application: performance, security, media processing, image processing, time coordinated, computing, etc. Day 1 sponsored by Intel.

Mitigate the Software Supply-Chain Risk

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Class 3 will delve into mitigating software supply-chain risk by implementing a thorough security audit process of ones software, which has become more critical as more code is being leveraged as opposed to written. We will discuss potential risks of leveraged code: previously trusted legacy code, commercial third-party code, and open-source code. We will discuss binary analysis technologies for efficiently assessing risk. This need is growing as too often this code isnt properly tested, especially with the specific target hardware. The instructor will be covering both the technical aspects and the process that should be followed, with special attention paid to software thats written for the IoT. Day 3 sponsored by GrammaTech.

Dont Let Concurrency Bring your System Down

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced Design and Automation

Class 2 will be a follow-on topic to class 1, where we will discuss the concept of concurrency. Its clear that todays developers need to be designing more efficient and higher performing applications using multi-threading, and testers need to understand how to efficiently pinpoint potential race conditions caused by concurrency defects that will lead to system failure. This is especially true when it comes to programming for multicore processors. Within the class, we will provide key insights and techniques for identifying concurrency defects, key to quality and safety, particularly as it pertains to the Internet of Things (IoT). Day 2 sponsored by GrammaTech.

Use Proper Taint Analysis, Especially in the IoT

Charles J. Lord, PE, President & Chief Trainer, Blue Ridge Advanced De
sign and Automation

In this class, we will teach software developers, testers, and analysts how taint analysis can identify exploitable areas within an application and/or system that could be used as an entry point by a hacker. Using IoT as our example, we will help perform proper taint analysis, evaluating how data modified purposely by a user or system (such as a variable set by a field in a web form or a package of information send across an automotive CAN bus) poses a potential security risk. With the continuing surge in code and data spawned by the IoTs popularity, this is especially needed to maximize security and maintain an efficient data flow, regardless of whether its data within an application or data thats transferred between applications. Given the enormous increase in application and system connectivity, all software should be analyzed for taint defects. Day 1 sponsored by GrammaTech.

Jim Snodgrass, Technical Training Manager, Cimquest

Whats coming down the road, what to expect and what is just a myth?. This will cover where things will go including 4d printing, conductive materials, bionic applications, accessible metal printing, true mass customization and if there will ever be a 3d printer in every home. Youll walk away with some ideas on what to look out for in technological advancements and how you can put yourself in a position to take advantage of these coming advancements. Day 3 sponsored by Stratasys

3D Printing – Application Beyond Prototyping

Jim Snodgrass, Technical Training Manager, Cimquest

Advanced processes and practices that show the value of 3d printing as a process and production aide. We will discuss the more cutting edge applications, who is advancing these methods and why? Also we will explore the less complex but most impactful applications being used in industry. This will help you understand what is possible when you start to really dive into how the technologies can be used. Day 2 sponsored by Stratasys

Educational events hosted by industry experts.

Educational events hosted by industry experts, brought to you by OpenSystems Media.

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The 10 best 3D printers of 2018

Finding the best 3D printer doesnt need to be difficult or expensive thanks to our guide to the best 3D printers on the market today. In this list, we provide clear and concise information on a wide range of 3D printers, helping you to choose the best 3D printer for your needs.

Our very own price comparison tool also scours the internet to find the very best deals on 3D printers, so when youve found the 3D printer thats right for you, you can buy confident in the knowledge that youre paying the best price.

From compact 3D printers that can sit on your desk, to budget 3D printers and huge industrial-grade 3D printers that can create large 3D printouts, weve listed the very best 3D printers available in 2018. Read on to find the best one for your needs.

Print technology:Fused Deposition ModelingCamera resolution:640 x 480Minimum layer resolution:100 micronsMaximum layer resolution:400 micronsDimensions:528 x 441 x 410 mmWeight:22.8kg

The MakerBot Replicator+ is the successor to the popular MakerBot Replicator 3D printer, and the new version has brought improvements to nearly every part of the Replicator. This means the Replicator+ is faster and quieter than the previous version, while maintaining its excellent design and safety features. This desktop 3D printer is expensive, but it offers excellent print quality, and uses 1.75mm polylactic acid (PLA) filament. Its also user-friendly enough for home users and hobbyists to use – as long as your budget can stretch to the high asking price.

Print technology:Fused Filament FabricationMinimum layer resolution:100 micronsMaximum layer resolution:400 micronsDimensions:390 x 335 x 360 mmWeight:10kg

If youre looking for a budget 3D printer, then there really is no better option than the XYZprinting da Vinci Mini. It remains one of the most affordable ways to get into 3D printing, and also the easiest, thanks to an easy-to-use interface. Just because its a budget model, doesnt mean it doesnt produce good results, and the 3D printed objects it creates are very impressive considering the price – and size – of this 3D printer. Speaking of size, the XYZprinting da Vinci Mini is an impressively compact printer that makes it easy to store in an office or on a desk.

Print technology:Fused Deposition ModelingMinimum layer resolution:20 micronsMaximum layer resolution:600 micronsDimensions:342 x 493 x 588 mmWeight:11.3kg

The Ultimaker 2+ is a 3D printer that offers amazing print quality, making it one of the best 3D printers for professional use. It is incredibly reliable when it comes to producing 3D models, and the accuracy of the 3D replications is incredibly impressive. If you need a 3D printer that can reliably reproduce many 3D objects accurately, this is a fantastic choice. However, it is expensive, and the fact that it is aimed at professional environments means its less beginner-friendly than some of the other 3D printers here. Home users are better off looking elsewhere.

Print technology:StereolithographyMinimum layer resolution:25 micronsMaximum layer resolution:100 micronsDimensions:350 x 330 x 520 mmWeight:13kg

The Formlabs Form 2 is an excellent 3D printer for enthusiasts who dont mind paying extra to get the very best print quality. Its a beautifully-designed 3D printer, and can be connected to PCs via USB, Wi-Fi and Ethernet. It doesnt quite have the print reliability of the Ultimaker 2+, but the print quality more than makes up for a few errors.

Print technology:Fused Filament FabricationMinimum layer resolution:50 micronsMaximum layer resolution:350 micronsDimensions:185 x 185 x 185 mmWeight:1kg

The M3D Micro 3D Printer is an excellent 3D printer for beginners. Its low price means youre not investing lots of money if youre not entirely sure 3D printing is for you, while the compact, cube, design means it can be easily placed within the home or office. It looks good, and is impressively quiet when in use. The print quality isnt the best, however, and it is only able to make small models (not too surprising, considering the diminutive size). However, if youre looking for your first 3D printer, this is an excellent choice.

Print technology:Fused deposition modelingMinimum layer resolution:100 micronsMaximum layer resolution:500 micronsDimensions:526 x 360 x 389 mm

The FlashForge Creator Pro 2017 is the best 3D printer that sits between budget 3D printers and expensive professional models. Its a lot cheaper than pro models, though it maintains the build quality and reliability that youd come to expect from a professional 3D printer. Its not quite as cheap as the budget and beginner models in this list, but it offers greater accuracy when printing 3D models. It is a tad noisy in use, however.

Another great 3D printer for beginners

Print technology:Fused deposition modelingMinimum layer resolution:50 micronsMaximum layer resolution:500 micronsDimensions:435 mm x 340 mm x 385 mmWeight:11.33kg

If youre looking for a first 3D printer to learn the ropes with, then the LulzBot Mini is another excellent choice. Its got a decent price, and is easy to use, though the print speed is quite slow. The hardware is open source, which means it has a flexibility that propitiatory hardware lacks, as a committed community of makers can work together to create add-ons for the printer.

Best for three-colour, three-material printing at an incredible price

Print technology:Fused deposition modelingMinimum layer resolution:70 micronsMaximum layer resolution:300 micronsDimensions:578 mm x 591 mm x 578 mmWeight:41kg

The bulk of home 3D printers are limited to one- or two-colour printing, but the CubePro Trio has the capability to print three different materials in one session. This can be especially useful if you want to create an enclosed mechanism: nylon can be used for the gears, ABS for the surround and PLA for the support structure that can then be dissolved with caustic soda. The CubePro is an ideal solution for modellers and engineers who need to create 3D prints with moving parts.

Print technology:Fused filament fabricationMinimum layer resolution:50 micronsMaximum layer resolution:300 micronsDimensions:400 x 140 x 400 mmWeight:10.5kg

In general terms 3D printers are designed as boxes with purpose, however BeeTheFirst has created a printer with both quality of print and actual design in mind this is a machine that really wouldnt look out of place in a modern living room. BeeTheFirst has also thought about how and where people will be wanting to use their printers at work, home or both and has incorporated a thin design with a handle that enables the printer to be easily transported.

A brilliant update to the formidable Taz

Print technology:Fused Deposition ModelingMinimum layer resolution:75 micronsMaximum layer resolution:300 micronsDimensions:660 x 520 x 350 mmWeight:19.5kg

Initially you might be hard pressed to see the differences between the Taz 5 and 6; both feature a solid open frame build, large print base and ease of use.

However take a closer look at the refinements in design and improvements in usability and the upgrades quickly stand out. Features such as the auto leveling base has evolved from the one featured on the Luzbot Mini and works just as well on this larger scale, and the slight changes to frame layout and control panel are all welcome.

The Taz 6 is a big machine with an impressive print area of 280mm x 280mm x 250mm, with a 0.5mm nozzle capable of a minimum layer height of 75 microns and takes 2.85mm filament.

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Overview of 3D-printer types and architectures

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Discussion in3D printersstarted byNaurdanSep 12, 2016.

Im a mechatronicengineer student and together with a group of engineerstudents are going to design and build a 3D-printer that prints chocolate. Weve got some design ideas and have made a few prestudies about the mechanics and constructions of 3D-printers.

But ive got a problem wrapping my head around the lango and types of architectures of the 3D-printers.

The coordinate systems (carthesian, delta and polar types of architectures) are quite self explanatory, but id need some help with the types of bots out there.

Is there a good overview of example what differentiates a c-bot from a d-bot, whats the pros and cons of a h-bot vs corexy. Can a c-bot utilise the h-bot belt construction? and so on.

Id be very greatful for any links, references or explanations.

Also, for a 3D-chocolate printer, what construction type would you go with, and why?

for a 3D-chocolate printer, what construction type would you go with, and why?

For anyone to offer reasonable suggestions there you will need to provide a better explanation of the nature of the anticipated output. A machine for decorating sheet cakes with chocolate will be entirely different from one creating highly detailed chocolate micro-figurines. What is your anticipated working area/volume? Will the end product have issues with bed motion? Also have you worked through the conveyance and depositing system for the chocolate? Will this require a lot of weight be accounted for at the print head? Will motion affect it? Will it be done Bowden style?

You need to be thinking through this process in reverse. The end results will help determine the process and the process will help define the mechanism. If you start machine first, the end results will be dictated by the machine which may not ultimately result in what you desire.

This oughta be a hoot! We have a life-sized butter cow at our state fair every year in August, and a couple of us keep thinking we can make a butter printer.

For anyone to offer reasonable suggestions there you will need to provide a better explanation of the nature of the anticipated output. What is your anticipated working area/volume? Will the end product have issues with bed motion? Also have you worked through the conveyance and depositing system for the chocolate? Will this require a lot of weight be accounted for at the print head? Will motion affect it? Will it be done Bowden style?

Thanks for a thorough answer. The printer, when finished, are going to be exhibited at school publicity events to recruit new students and such. So i dont think the volume is a priority, though design, functionality and to be easy for a lot of people to see (not alot of covers that is). Also im sure a good end result of the printed chocolate is preferable, but not a priority.

Weve also worked out a system of pressurized tanks at the sides of the printers, with a tube of melted chocolate connected to the printers head. (Bowden style) There wont be any extra weight or resistance to the head.

But i see the point you are making with that weve got to start in the other end with specifying the end product, and i agree.

If i may ask, how did you learn about the different types of bot? Is it just by experience, reading about different builds and bots?

The main thing that confused me right now is the difference between c-bot, d-bot and h-bot.

This sounds like a really neat project and one that will grab the interest of the students! Cant wait to see the build. Be sure to contact the Parts Store and line up your education discount before ordering.

The main thing that confused me right now is the difference between c-bot, d-bot and h-bot.

If i may ask, how did you learn about the different types of bot? Is it just by experience, reading about different builds and bots?

Sorry, but I was hoping one of the experts from this section of the forum would jump in here. (This is not my area.) From an outsiders perspective though, if youre looking for a visual crowd pleaser, you cant beat a delta. They are mesmerizing to watch. But they will only be worth watching if you can get the chocolate to cool fast enough that you can build vertical figurines (i.e.rabbitsvases, etc.) Have you carried the process through far enough to verify if the chocolate will build upward or do you already expect that you will be limited to flatwork?

Im a complete noob to 3d printing, and Naurdans comment definitely echoed what Ive been wondering. I have a technical electronics background so a friend asked me if I could help him assemble a kickstarter 3d printer he got that has sat in a box in pieces for far too long. That was about three weeks ago and Ive been swimming in the 3d printing sea of terms since. So…

As an attempt to figure what the heck it all means, Ill try to answer the question and reference what I find along the way.

Serial Stackup vs Parallel Manipulator Systems:

One of the first distinctions between a lot of the common printers is if the motors are arranged in a serial stackup or a parallel manipulator reXY – RepRapWikiIn a serial stackup system, at least one motor is being moved by another motor. In the photo below fromRepRap Machines – RepRapWiki, you can see the serial stackup arrangement in the Prusa i3 design. On the Prusa i3, the y-axis moves the bed. The x-axis motor is being moved up and down whenever the z-axis motor runs. The x-axis motor is seen on the side of the machine, with the shaft pointing toward the camera. The two z-axis motors can be seen at the bottom on each side of the vertical frame. Even though there is an additional motor in middle of the photo near the print head, this motor drives the extruder and doesnt effect the axial movement of the printer.

With respect to the OpenBuilds categories, the serial stackup arrangement seems to be seen primarily in the Cartesian Style Bots.

Contrast this with a photo of the C-Bot, seen below. The two motors on the front are running the x- and y-axis, while there are two motors at the back of the base of the frame driving the z-axis. All of the motors on this machine are fixed with relation to the frame and each other.

All the designs you mentioned (C-Bot, D-Bot, and H-Bot) fall in the H-Bot and Core XY category of OpenBuilds. The C-Bot and D-Bot are both types of Core-XY designs, while the H-Bot is a little different. Note that the distinction between an H-Bot and Core-XY design is specifically regarding the way the belts are ran to move the motor with the printer head.

For the differences between H-bot and Core-XY, read this:Double Jump ElectricIm going to pull a few images from this article to make my point, but Im definitely not doing it justice. Just read the article.

The H-bot seems to be named as such because of the way the belt structures make an H shape…? As seen in the article I referenced, there are two sources of torque seen by the green arrows going in opposite directions that end up putting a lot of stress on the frame.

The Core-XY design removes the opposing torques seen in the H-Bot. Im not going to explain what is going on here because Im still trying to wrap my mind around it.

On OpenBuilds, most of the Core-XY designs Ive seen are parallel manipulator systems, but the dont have to be. By fixing the printbed, and moving both the x and y axis with the z-axis, you can make a Core-XY in to a serial stackup, which seems to be what is going on in this build:CoreXY W/ Fixed Build Plate & EnclosureSince Core-XY is just a belt configuration, it can get applied to a lot of different types of systems, which makes it confusing…

The C-bot, designed by Carl Feniak, is a Core-XY design that attempts to improve on the general Core-XY design. Carl says the C-bot has no crossing belts as found in most core XY printers and instead uses two offset parallel belt runs.C-BotI cant seem to see the belts well enough to appreciate what is happening here. Maybe someone can chime in…

On thingiverse.com, spauda01 posted a design they called theD-Bot Core-XY 3D Printer. They conveniently list the differences between the C-Bot and D-Bot on that page, which Ive included below:

1) The lead screws and Z motors were moved forward to better lift the print bed from its center of gravity rather than use a fully cantilevered print bed.

2) Increased printable Z height to 330mm (~13)

3) Use of 20mm rails for the bottom sections to save cost and reduce bulk.

4) Various adjustments of printable parts, either to add plastic where it seemed like more rigidity was needed or to subtract plastic where it was not needed.

5) Accessories such as a simplified spool holder a cable chain for bed wiring

6) Relocated endstop mounting to maximize Y travel and utilize default homing scheme.

7) Overall reduction in cost compared to the original bill of materials (2$ square nuts vs 40$ Tnuts, etc.)

I have no idea if spauda01 was the D-Bot creator, but FWIW, there you go.

Ive got lots of questions now but Ill try them out on another thread. Thanks.

Thanks alot for your help, alot of questionmarks have been straightened out! Especially Cazgram, for the effort and a very good explanation!

and for those who are curious, when the planing phase of the project is complete andif weve got the time, well be posting the build here on OpenBuilds.

Thanks for sharing this amazing post. I come to know that the information is published in 2016. There may be some updations required in the above article. I have found the updated information of 3D printer types. Hope it would be useful to all forum members. Here is the post that Innofil3D has inboxed me last week.How to select a 3D-printer – Innofil3D

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Why a Delta?

The 3D community is being bombarderd by 3D printer models. Everyone has their own way of doing it the right way. Deltas are not the holy grail in home printing but they do have some advantages above the standard printers. Plus, they look really cool.

The biggest difference between a Delta and 80% off all other 3D printers is its method of moving. Most printers use the Cartesian system (left to right, front to back and up and down). This is the easy way of getting from point a to point b because a straight line is just one plane or one axis moving. The downside is that the moving parts are quite heavy. A 3D printer needs to be able to change its direction instantly and as fast as possible. The heavier the moving part, the harder it is to make it stop or change direction in an instant.

The benefit of a Delta is that the moving parts are lightweight so that its easier to travel. That results in faster printing with greater accuracy. Most traditional printers have a moving buildplatform. This means that the object you are printing is always moving which can lead to prints coming loose due to the constant jerks and to inaccurate prints especially when the prints get higher.

Deltas are generally better in building higher objects like for instance a vase because the buildplatform is fixed. They tend to be higher anyway which creates a bigger buildvolume. Because of the way they are build it is also fairly easy to make them bigger (in width but certainly in height). The overall construction is much less complicated and uses less parts reducing maintenance and costs.

There is one downside though. Because of the arm construction it must be a lot taller than your build volume.

One big advantage of our printers is the presence of an auto-level feature. This greatly reduces the time it takes to calibrate the machine. It auto-levels before each print so even if your setup changes slightly due to normal use, the auto-level will always give you a flat first layer.

Have a look atour selection of Delta 3D printers.

We offer worldwide free shipping on all orders above 250 euro! No strings attached.

Orders below that will pay a modest 15 euro flat fee worldwide. Dutch customers pay a 5 euro flat fee for orders under 250 euro.

Our components and prints are of the highest quality. We pride ourselves in the performance of our printers and we use our own products to print your parts. Only parts that meet our high level of quality are shipped. The prints are not undergoing any post-treatment. So when you get them, they are straight of the printer. This is proof of the quality that is achievable.

Sometimes things go wrong, thats life. But you can be assured that we will do what we can so you can build your printer. Not only replacing whats broken or missing (yes, it happens) but also giving you pointers when your stuck in the build. Building a 3D printer can be awesome and fun but sometimes also challenging or even frustrating. Dont worry, weve got your back!

If you have any questions about our products, technical questions or well anything really, then please contact us. To avoid waiting for us, did you check if your problem is featured on theTroubleshooting Guide?

We sell robots but we are not robots ourselves. Mistakes happen. So, f there is an issue with your order in any way then please contact us so we can resolve the issue quickly.

We strive to answer all mails within 24-48 hours max. During weekends this can be longer of course.

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What are the Types of 3D Printing Materials?

There are many types of 3D printing materials in the market and it is important to learn about these materials and the differences between them. Furthermore, if you are thinking in buying a 3D printer, you need to find out the supported materials and if it meets with your project or business.

In a previous article,What Are the Types of 3D Printing Technologies?,we explored the different types of 3D printers and each printer type works with specific range of materials.

The 3D printing materials vary based on many factors such as the printing technology, the look and feel of printed object, flexibility and sustainability, and of course the price. These factors should be considered when buying your first 3D printer and its associated materials.

The high price for 3D printing materials is another reason to learn about each type and how to choose the one that fit with your project needs with low price.

Below, we will explore the different types of 3D printing materials and characteristics of each of them:

The plastics are the most commonly used materials because its cheap price and support by many of the desktop 3D printers (5 Affordable 3D Printers to Buy). The 3D printers that use this type of materials are known asFused Deposition Modeling (FDM).

The technique behind this material is very simple, the desktop printer heats the plastic filament and the heated plastic extrude into the printing bed as very small layers above each other the create the complicated 3D model. In industrial 3D printers, the filament is heated using UV lasers.

There are different types of plastic filament such as the following:

ABS (acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), strong material allows high carving accuracy. It is also durable and heat resistance.

PLA (Polyactic Acid), plant-based plastic with low melting point.

Additionally, there are other materials such as the PC (Polycarbonate) and HDPE (High Density Poly Ethylene).

These materials are used in Stereolithography printing, where a UV laser beam carve the 3D model in a resin liquid. The output of printing using photopolymer resin is very detailed and have smooth surface. The photopolymer resin materials include high detail resin, paintable resin, transparent resin,etc.

The video below shows how to use the resin materials in 3D printing.

There are various materials that are used in a powder form such as ceramics 3D printing materials, and metal 3D materials. The technique behind these materials is similar to the stereolithography.

Instead of using the photopolymer as a printing materials., the laser beam carve the 3D model in the material in powder form to join the powder grains together in thin layers. After building the 3D model the unused powder is removed in a process called de-powdering.

iMaterialise provides a usefulPeriodic Table of Materialsthat give more idea about the different 3D printing materials and examples for each material.

As the 3D printing technology evolves, new materials are used and tested such as food, chocolate, nylon, organic tissues. Some materials are very expensive and others do not provide the required quality. So, it is important to plan for your 3D printing project and the best material that fit with the project adjectives.

If you would like to share with us other 3D printing materials, feel free to submit to the comments below or through theSubmit Project or Newslink.

This post is created by the 3D Printing Pin team. We would like to hear your comments and ideas. Feel free to share it with us in the comments form below.

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3 Types of Plastic Used in 3D Printing

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3 Types of Plastic Used in 3D Printing

3 Types of Plastic Used in 3D Printing

From anartificial skull made of acrylicto custom confections created from chocolate, the world of 3D printing keeps getting more amazing. Today, 3D printers can allow people to create virtually anything, using a variety of materials, from metal and ceramic to sugar and Styrofoam. Of course, plastic is the substance that first made 3D printing of any kind possible, and plastic remains one of the most common and versatile types of materials used in 3D printing.

A commenter on arecent Polymer Solutions blogasked for information about the most common types of plastics used in 3D printing. Heres a little bit about the three most-frequently used plastics that have helped spur the amazing evolution of 3D printing:

Polylactic Acid (PLA) Its probably no surprise that one of the most commonly used bioplastics in the world would also dominate in 3D printing. A biodegradable thermoplastic aliphatic polyester, PLA is made from renewable, organic resources like corn starch or sugarcane. Its commonly used to make food packaging and biodegradable medical devices and implants. PLA is great for 3D printing because its easy to work with, environmentally friendly, available in a variety of colors, and can be used as either a resin or filament.

Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) A terpolymer fabricated by polymerizing styrene and acrylonitrile with polybutadiene, ABS is another plastic commonly used in 3D printing. Beginners especially favor it for its ease of use in its filament form, and because its durable, strong, heat-resistant, cost-effective and flexible. However, because its petroleum-based and not biodegradable, ABS is losing popularity among 3D hobbyists who prefer the more eco-friendly nature of PLA. Also, when heated in a 3D printer for the fabrication process, ABS can give off fumes that might be irritating.

Polyvinyl Alcohol Plastic (PVA) A water-soluble plastic, PVA is most commonly used as a glue, thickener or packaging film. In the world of 3D printing, PVA isnt necessarily used to make the finished product, but rather to create a support structure for portions of a product that may warp or collapse during the printing process. In printers with two or more extruders, the user can employ one or more extruders to create a support structure of PVA while the others work to create the actual product out of other materials. When the printing is done, the finished and cured product can be dunked in water until the PVA support structure dissolves away.

Of course, the range of materials that can be used in 3D printing continues to expand and evolve along with the process and its applications. Still, one of the most amazing developments in manufacturing traces its beginnings to the original space-age material plastic. And that strikes us as very fitting!

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Professional software for all 3D Printer types

Be a part of an innovative project and develop SOFTSHAPER with us.

Discover SOFTSHAPER – Professional software for every 3D Printer.

Supporting all types of 3D Printers

SOFTSHAPER allows the user to operate worlds most popular 3D Printers. If you want to use different models of 3D Printers in your work and work on your projects using only one software – heres your chance!

The software supports the process of preparing models for 3D Printing with the use of any material. If the projects you work on are too demanding for commercially available software – you have just found the right one!

SOFTSHAPER uses the functionalities of CAD/CAM software in the process of preparation of models for 3D Printing. If you came across limitations of commercially available programs supporting 3D Printing – now you know how to overcome them!

Innovative software using cutting-edge methods of path visualization

Apart from generating G-CODE for 3D Printers, SOFTSHAPER has functions which allow the user to modify project features to achieve optimal printing parameters. Available path visualization methods enable the user to analyze single stages and to verify the speed, specify the head and contour type.

Effortless creation of printed models strength

SOFTSHAPER allows the user to modify the layer structure of created models, offering you the possibility to strengthen or weaken chosen structures and check the impact of changes on the models strength.

Creating sets of models and project saving and loading

SOFTSHAPER allows the user to save positioning settings of models in the form of an set so theres no need to import and position them again. Saving a project allows you to continue your work on a different computer.

Adaptive algorithm for cutting and generating paths

SOFTSHAPER automatically detects objects, features and parameters which need to be updated and it selectively performs an update of sequences. Because of this, the modification of parameters does not result in the user having to cut the model again.

Customizable infill structures, supports, contours

SOFTSHAPER boasts a wide range of infill types, supports and free model contour parameterization. The user can choose a type of infill from Fractal, Sun, Honey Comb, Square, Concentric Square, Line and others.

Automatic definition of technological parameters based on quality factor

SOFTSHAPER is equipped with generic algorithm for selection of technological parameters enabling the user to perform printing operations in an easy and reliable way.

„SOFTSHAPER allows the user to load very large 3D objects, consisting of up to few millions of triangles, made during model scanning. Defining printing features in the form of outer and inner contours, flat lands and supports simplifies the technology preparation process allowing its modification.

– Prof. Ryszard Leniowski, R&D Software Manager, VERASHAPE

Have additional questions? Need a quote, or consulting? Contact us. Well be glad to get back to you with a prompt answer. Dont hesitate – were waiting for your questions!

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What types of materials are available for 3D printing? 3D Printing – Quora

What types of materials are available for 3D printing?

To answer your general question, you can make objects using a few types of plastic (ABS, PLA, nylon, etc.), metals (titanium, silver, steel, etc.), and other materials like ceramics and even rubber-like substances. Keep in mind that different materials require different manufacturing methods as well.

In response to your idea: If you plan to make a lot of this product without variation it may be more economical to use a more traditional manufacturing method.

If you dont plan to make too many items, or want to customize them, or just want to test it out with a prototype, there are many ways you can get this done. For an example from a consumer-oriented company, check outShapeways elasto plastic:

P.S. Thanks for the request to answer!

Related QuestionsMore Answers Below

What are all the materials which can be used as a medium for 3D printing?

What are the costs for 3D printing materials?

What are the most common materials used for 3D printing?

What are the strongest materials in 3D printing that is widely available?

We made a page that shows the all the available materials for desktop printers here:

THRE3D also has a list of most all of the materials available for professional machines of any technology type, here:Materials on THRE3D

Id say a boot is possible in TPE, which is a nice rubber material, that can be printed off many consumer based 3D printers. Theres a lot of debate on weather it can be done economically on large economies of scale, but essentiallythe most economical use of 3D Printing is for printing large quantities of unique versions of things. For example, printing out thousands of dentures that all have the unique shapes of different patients teeth.567Views5 Upvotes4 UpvotesPromoted by Fusion3Learn More at mPatrick Lie, works at MicrosoftAnswered179w agoThe short answer is nearly any material available can be 3D printed. The complete answer is it depends on what 3D printing technology you are using. A rough breakdown of material to technology (in order of increasing machine cost) is:

Inkjet – Plasters, Photopolymer resins

SLS/SLM – Huge range of plastics and metals

Ive seen inkjet printers print materials with a rubber consistency, so its definitely doable.

3D Printing is used for both prototyping and small run custom jobs (aerospace and high end auto are good examples of this). An example of mass production 3D Printing would be something likeInvisalign teeth braces. Its not mass production in the traditional sense as each brace is custom fit for a single person, but they create thousands of these in a factory setting.252Views3 Upvotes2 UpvotesLarry Pieniazek, LEGO addict, inactive Wikimedian, Geek, Music fan, IBMer, Parent, SF fan, Gamer, student of communities, Qu…Answered211w agoI dont know that there is a flexible printable material yet, but Im sure its just a matter of time.

I know that there are a fairly large number of polymers that are available, as well as sintered metal powders and even metals, as well as sugar.

Hopefully this A2A answer will spur better ones.188Views1 UpvoteAnswer requested byQuora UserTaj BennitAnswered211w agoThere are flexible materials which can be run through a 3d printer.

However if you want the consistency of a thin rubber boot upper, My advice is to 3d print one, and finish the surface properly. Then make a mold (I am thinking a 2 part plaster mold, but maybe consult an expert model maker), and cast silicone objects. You should be able to buy what you need at Tap plastics, and learn how on youtube. You should be able to make small production runs ( 1000) using this method. If you are doing 1000+ it may make sense to get a mold made out of aluminum and hire an injection molder to mass produce the part.

, Shaping the Tech-enabled Future of Knowledge Work

which helps you comparison shop for your 3D printing job orders by kind of materials available, etc.

Are there any echogenic 3D printing materials available?

How can I clean 3D printing materials?

How do 3D printers print biological material?

Which material is used in 3D printing?

Are 3D printed prosthetics commercially available yet?

Can a 3D printer print another 3D printer? My friend told me that hes printing a 3D printer from his 3D printer. Can someone print a 3D print…

What types of 3D printing are there?

Still have a question? Ask your own!

What are all the materials which can be used as a medium for 3D printing?

What are the costs for 3D printing materials?

What are the most common materials used for 3D printing?

What are the strongest materials in 3D printing that is widely available?

Are there any echogenic 3D printing materials available?

How can I clean 3D printing materials?

How do 3D printers print biological material?

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Cartesian Delta and Polar The Most Common 3D Printers

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Cartesian, Delta, and Polar: The Most Common 3D Printers

I used to build a lot of things out of steel. Then I earned a design degree. Now, I work as a CAD drafter by day and by night, I build 3D printers. I use these, the most wonderful of tools, to explore biomimetic structures. My favorite thing in the universe is a good idea and my goal is to generate and/or promote as many of them as possible. Find out more atchandicampbell.com.

I used to build a lot of things out of steel. Then I earned a design degree. Now, I work as a CAD drafter by day and by night, I build 3D printers. I use these, the most wonderful of tools, to explore biomimetic structures. My favorite thing in the universe is a good idea and my goal is to generate and/or promote as many of them as possible. Find out more atchandicampbell.com.

>

If youre a regular reader here at Make, then you have seen many 3D printers. We talk about them all the time, and have even done comprehensive comparisons between many of the commercially available desktop printers in ourSpecial 3D Printer Shootout Issue. One common question we get though, is why does that one look different than the one over there?. To hopefully answer that question a bit, wed like to take you through the 3 most common filament based printer configurations.  Well toss in some quirky and interesting oddballs at the end too.

Lets start with the Cartesian. These printers are named after the most widely used coordinate system which helps robots to decide where and how to move. They will typically have a square print bed which will run along the Y-axis. The X-axis will carry the print head and for the Z-axis (up and down) movement, the print bed may descend as it does onthis Ultimaker 2or the X-axis will rise up as the printer builds objects like it does on thePrintrbot Simple.

Another popular printer style is called the Delta. Delta printers also work within the Cartesian plane however as you can see when you look atthe DeltaMaker, they cant be mistaken for Cartesians. Deltas will usually feature a circular print bed. The extruder will be suspended above that by three arms in a triangular configuration (thus the name Delta). These nifty robots were designed for speed and they also have the advantage of a print bed that does not move which could be advantageous for certain prints.

If Cartesian and Delta printers are too straightforward for you, how about a Polar 3D printer? Photos simply dont do these bad boys justice so check out a video instead.

These machines use polar coordinates. This system is similar to the Cartesian except that the coordinate sets describe points on a circular grid rather than a square. Yes, with a little rocket science, we can have a printer with a spinning bed and a print head that moves up, down, left and right. No need for forward and backward movement! On a side note, did you know thatyou can make a rocket engine with any of these printers?

Lastly, lets not overlook those oddball printers that we find in the robust RepRap community. Theres a fellow by the name of Nicholas Seward who is creating some beautiful bots. Check out his SCARA (Selective Compliance Articulated Robot Arm) style printer.

He also designed a Delta variation called the GUS Simpson that is, well, poetry. I mean just look!

So whether you want to make rocket engines, Yoda figures or robots with positronic brains, there is a 3D printer out there for you. Have fun in the new age!

I used to build a lot of things out of steel. Then I earned a design degree. Now, I work as a CAD drafter by day and by night, I build 3D printers. I use these, the most wonderful of tools, to explore biomimetic structures. My favorite thing in the universe is a good idea and my goal is to generate and/or promote as many of them as possible. Find out more atchandicampbell.com.

I used to build a lot of things out of steel. Then I earned a design degree. Now, I work as a CAD drafter by day and by night, I build 3D printers. I use these, the most wonderful of tools, to explore biomimetic structures. My favorite thing in the universe is a good idea and my goal is to generate and/or promote as many of them as possible. Find out more atchandicampbell.com.

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